The positive and negative arguments for buying a hybrid car

They can save you money on fuel, are better for the environment, and with an increasing number of models becoming available, are now trendier than ever. But is it all plain sailing for hybrid cars – after all, if they’re so good, wouldn’t everyone be driving a hybrid car? In this blog we take a look at the positive sides of purchasing a ‘car for the future’, and look at why you might sell a hybrid car if you aren’t happy with it.

Positives

Incentive to drive efficiently

When you accelerate gradually in a hybrid car, this often uses only the electric engine. For drivers that usually love putting the pedal to the metal, this can encourage them to drive slower and more efficiently.

Suited to the city

For urban residents, a hybrid car can present the perfect solution. Whenever you stop, you are theoretically charging by electricity generation, which gives you power to use at low speeds in typically congested areas.

It’s oh so quiet

If you like the feeling of slipping down the road almost unnoticed, hybrid cars are discernibly slower than cars which are running a gasoline engine.

Nice and warm

Models such as the Toyota Prius are able to keep the car warm on those cold winter mornings by storing coolant in a Thermos-type container. This means you won’t be putting your cold engine under unnecessary pressure when starting it.

Negatives

Increase in fuel prices = rise in hybrid prices

As the cost of filling up surges, hybrid cars become more of an attractive option for drivers looking to buy a car, and when something becomes popular, naturally prices begin to rise.

Lack of larger vehicles

There is a distinct lack of hybrid options in the SUV market, and for those of us with a family, that value the option of a third row of seats, this can be a decisive factor. Toyota’s Highlander Hybrid SUV is one of the alternatives, however, although it has been pulled up for the comparatively low mileage it offers compared to smaller hybrids.

Weak battery

It has been reported that an ‘aftermarket’ battery that can be purchased for a hybrid car actually lasts a lot longer than the one which comes with the vehicle. Mistakes such as leaving an interior light on could leave you completely drained.